Eudaemonia

Inspiration, with Gary Metivier

May 20, 2020 Kim Forrester Season 6 Episode 5
Eudaemonia
Inspiration, with Gary Metivier
Chapters
Eudaemonia
Inspiration, with Gary Metivier
May 20, 2020 Season 6 Episode 5
Kim Forrester

Gary Metivier is an Emmy award-winning Executive Producer, author, creative consultant, and seasoned news anchor with more than 20 years’ experience in broadcasting. He is also the founder of The Heart of the Story video series and podcast.

On this episode, Kim and Gary discuss the importance of inspiration and explore how we can tap into positivity and passion to live a more fulfilling life. 

Show Notes Transcript

Gary Metivier is an Emmy award-winning Executive Producer, author, creative consultant, and seasoned news anchor with more than 20 years’ experience in broadcasting. He is also the founder of The Heart of the Story video series and podcast.

On this episode, Kim and Gary discuss the importance of inspiration and explore how we can tap into positivity and passion to live a more fulfilling life. 

Kim Forrester:

Of all the amazing ideas, innovations, and achievements in human history, it's almost certain that each one of them began as nothing more than an inspired spark of creativity or passion. You're listening to the Eudaemonia podcast. I'm Kim Forrester and, today, we're going to lift the lid on inspiration.

Intro:

Welcome to Eudemonia, the podcast that is all about the flourishing. Plug in, relax and get ready for the goodness as we explore the traits and practices that can help you thrive in life ... with your host Kim Forrester.

Kim Forrester:

Gary Metivier is an Executive Producer, author, creative consultant, and seasoned news anchor with more than 20 years experience in broadcasting. Based in Iowa, USA, Gary has earned three Emmys, three Edward R. Murrow awards and a dozen Emmy nominations for his work in journalism. He recently left broadcasting to launch his own business, sharing real life stories that lift and inspire. It's my honor to be connecting with Gary today to discuss the importance of inspiration and to explore how we can tap into positivity and passion to live a more fulfilling life. Gary Metivier, it's just such a delight to have you with me here on the Eudaemonia podcast. Thank you for coming and joining me.

Gary Metivier:

Oh, thank you for having me. I'm ecstatic about being here.

Kim Forrester:

Oh, that's delightful to say. Let's start at the beginning, Gary, because you say that you entered the media industry a few decades ago in order to inspire people. So inspiration has obviously been a big part of your life all of this time. What was your vision back then? How did you feel that you could inspire people through the media?

Gary Metivier:

Well, interestingly enough, Kim, I'm from a family of 12 siblings - uh, 11 siblings, 12 kids in our family - and I was one of the youngest and very, very shy. And it was actually through a Christian service project in high school that I got introduced to the world of journalism. Someone came out to do a profile story on me doing a Christian service project where we befriended a senior in a nursing home, and we spent one day a week going and spending time with that senior who did not have any family or friends or anyone else. So we would come in and become a buddy with them. So the news station came out and asked if they could interview me about this. And I eagerly watched to see how they put that story together. And man, I was so inspired by, not only the storytelling, but the impact that a story like that could have on people. And, in fact, the program grew leaps and bounds after that and more people wanted to find ways that they could help and they could make a difference with their skills. And, sometimes, those skills are as simple as sitting down and talking to a senior who has no one else to talk to. And I was hooked from the beginning. And again, I was very, very shy. So it took a lot for me to start coming out of my shell. But that was my first step. That's when I realized that you can make a difference with whatever talents you have.

Kim Forrester:

That is such a beautiful story. Certainly these days, there are still those long form storytellers out there in the media. You know, you can go and you can find the investigative journalism and the people who are going out and telling stories. You yourself, you create The Heart of the Story. However, without laying judgment or blame, I think it's pretty safe to say that most of our modern media is actually about consumption. Quick consumption, right? It's about soundbites and click bait. So in that more superficial media industry, do you think we're missing an important sense of inspiration?

Gary Metivier:

Oh, big time. Big time. You can blame it on busy lives, short attention span. It's our culture. Our society has changed tremendously, but so have our news organizations and so have storytellers. Storytelling, as you mentioned; the clicks and the soundbites. I can't tell you how many meetings I've been in the past, in particular, the past three and a half to four years, where people say, 'Wow, this story got a lot of clicks' or 'This simple ridiculous thing got so much reaction'. And it's like, okay, well that may be that, but that's not journalism. That's not good storytelling. So the constant fight, to be honest with you, for the good stories was on. I think the guiding principle of news is bring you something of value. But when some of the people in control began to make money, they make profits off the clickbait and keeping people on a little bit longer. So sometimes as strategies change and in our world now, in particular here in the States, where you can monitor people's viewing habits down to the minute, it's harder than ever to get long form into a traditional news broadcast now. Because people say, well, they don't want that longer stuff. We've got to keep their attention. We've got to keep throwing stuff at them and hoping something clicks. And that's kind of sad, if you will.

Kim Forrester:

I do wonder, I do have a concern about what this more superficial consumption of information is doing for us as human beings. Do you feel, just from your point of view, that we as a society are missing out on opportunities to be inspired, to find passion, to dream bigger when we don't take the time or don't demand from the media more valuable, deeper insightful stories?

Gary Metivier:

Well, I thought so. My answer probably two years ago would have been 'yes'. But now I think there's a silver lining to this. We have more platforms than ever before of people finding ways to share and consume stories. I used to feel really bad, to be honest with you. I anchored three newscasts a day for about 30 years and I fought so hard to try and get positive news in there - and I did manage to succeed to some degree, but I can only do so much. But now, you know what? You don't have to just look to a news organization for your storytelling. There are so many great platforms out there that are evolving and developing that are not so reliant on the clickbait. They're not so reliant on corporate owners that are demanding more and more from less and less people. So there are more options. And I have to be honest with you, there are more and more people that want positive, inspiring, long form stories than ever before. So the consultants that have been pushing newspeople away from this for years, they're being proven wrong by the consumer who says, 'We've had enough. We want something that matters. I want to go to sleep at night after seeing a story that touches my heart in some way. Yes, maybe I'll cry, maybe I'll smile, but it touched my heart.' And that matters. That's humanity.

Kim Forrester:

Well, that's where the inspiration lies, isn't it?

Gary Metivier:

We also see that carrying over in advertising, right? Because people are getting smart about this and they're saying, 'Wow, if I can do this through a commercial', in particular here in the States, through all the isolation and all the things we're going through - that real push for, 'I have to connect with people now to sell my product to them. So we have to find a way to do that.' So they're getting good at that, as they are political, you know, with political campaigns and whatnot.

Kim Forrester:

We are certainly in this incredible societal inflection point. You know, this moment in history that we're going through right now. I can see that people's perceptions are changing and even trends that were already underway seem to be amplified, right now, with all that's going on around the world. And one of the things that I see changing is our focus on famous people. Right? On celebrities. It seems that, in the past, we've tended to look to famous people for inspiration. And I think what's really interesting is that you tell stories about everyday people. You left, your very lucrative, very successful career to go and meet everyday people and tell the stories that they are inspired by and that inspire others. Do you feel that we have been looking for inspiration in the wrong faces in the wrong places, Gary?

Gary Metivier:

Yes, 100% I was invited to the White House to interview President Obama in 2012; an exclusive interview. Mostly because I'm from Iowa State that holds the caucuses, which are important, and of course a swing state. But I knew going into that, 'Wow, this isn't about politics as much as it's about finding out what someone is about and connecting with them in a certain way.' So I made an attempt to interview the President of United States and connect with him like I would an everyday person. And what I discovered is this, I'm not impressed by politicians. I'm not impressed by celebrities, because they are portraying something that perhaps some people dream of being someday. But I see more power in everyday people that are doing things for their own reasons that bring them happiness, that make them smile. And I think more and more people, if they look at these people all around us that we can connect with and identify with ... You can't identify with being the President of the United States, but you can identify with the 80 year old teacher that's also a soccer player and coach still at age 80, that does it for the pure love of touching people's lives every day. And you can say, 'Wow, I want to be like her when I'm 80 or even when I'm 50', and you can connect; to take something away from that that you can't take away from a story of a celebrity or some politician.

Kim Forrester:

When you get to the heart of the story, Gary, when you have gone out and you have spoken to people and learned about what they're doing and what's inspiring them, what do you find there? Is there something that all of these people have in common?

Gary Metivier:

Yes. They're all people that would rather not share their story. That's actually what I find. Because most of my stories are about everyday people that say, 'Hey, I'm nothing special. Why would you want to talk to me?' And I say, 'Well, because you are something special. And because of that, that's why I want to talk with you.' I've interviewed so many veterans. In particular from World War II, Korea and Vietnam, who have never talked to people, including their families about some of the things they went through and what impact that had on the rest of their lives. And they shared with me incredible things. They just open up and then, at the end, I feel sometimes a little like, 'Hey, did we go too far? Do you not want me to use something?' And they've always 100% of time said, 'Use it all. Use it all.' If you just listen, people have so much to say and give. They're just not the one standing on some soapbox somewhere saying, 'Hey, look at me. Look at me.'

Kim Forrester:

Interesting there that you explain that most of your subjects aren't actually interested in being famous or being known for their stories. Because I see another trend in society in that we tend to, well, many people tend to attach fame, recognition, reward, wealth as their source of inspiration. I see a lot of people wanting to follow a particular career path or wanting to start a particular project, not because of a sense of personal achievement or passion, but because they literally want to be famous or be seen on TV. You've been there, Gary, you've been on TV three times a day. You've had multiple awards, you've enjoyed a great life. What is your perspective about being inspired by fame and wealth as opposed to being inspired by something that is quieter, more intimate?

Gary Metivier:

Interestingly, I've always hated the fame part of my job. Everywhere I go, everybody still knows who I am in my community and sometimes outside the community. I've always detested that. The only reason I liked the fame, if you will, was that it enabled me to reach more people so that I could use my storytelling to impact more people's lives. I did not like being on TV for the celebrity factor at all. Unfortunately, in our society though, as you mentioned, we have a society, Kim, where fame is so important; where you can put a Tik Tok out there and see how many likes you get. You put your Instagram out there and you're measured from a very young age. Now for our kids - this is what I'm concerned about - for them, you're measured on your likes and your reactions and how people are responding to you. And as parents I think, and as grandparents, we have to remind the next generation - and sometimes ourselves - that you have to do things for you and for the right reasons and not care so much about the fame part of it. But that is so hard because being famous, or being known for something, or being on TV is so important to people these days at a rate never seen before. Because anyone could be famous. Because, once again, there are so many platforms to put yourself out there. But that fame is fleeting and what people find is that ... it's like looking at a child actor, right? They had a great career and everybody treated them, putting them on a pedestal. They get a little bit older, they lose that cuteness, they lose that big role they had, and nobody cares about them anymore. So many of them become lost souls. That's why we see so many problems with child actors who go on to get into trouble in their lives - because they never had that foundation of what really matters in life. I'm going out and doing something that inspires you and lifts you up, making something with your talents, you know, to give back and make a difference.

Kim Forrester:

Let's go there because I love the way you talk about, you know, the depth of inspiration; what it's actually composed of. Do you feel that there are things that can open us up to inspiration? Do you feel that inspiration has got these little components that we need to become more aware of? Components like creativity, or curiosity, or faith, or just a simple sense of childlike play. Gary, are there attributes that you feel are woven into inspiration that we could amplify in our lives to compel us to become more inspired?

Gary Metivier:

I think we need to, as a people of all ages, go out and do something. Right? I mean, we're becoming consumers where we sit there and we can watch on demand. We can fast forward through everything. And I'm just as guilty as everyone else - from time to time to catch up on news on the national level, I'll tape it and I'll watch it later. I don't want to waste time; I fast forward through things. I think we all need to stop from time to time and sit back and say, 'What am I doing? What's important in life and how can I be a part of something and not just a consumer of everything that's coming my way?' Whether that be television or video games. I mean our kids are challenged more than ever. I have a ... my youngest son is 19 and he wants to be a neurologist or an orthopedic surgeon, and the wane of all they have to do between school, education, and their friends are all online playing games or a Netflix binge watching TV. We consume, consume, consume, and we don't take enough time to get in touch with the things that really light our fire. Right? The things that make us exciting, the science of something that may say, 'Wow, look at this!' And then take that, pursue it. It's so much easier just to sit there and take things in rather than go out and actually be a part of it.

Kim Forrester:

Is there room for inspiration in any life? Do you feel that the, you know, the busy mother who's got three children at school and is working two jobs to stay afloat, or the college student who is just studying really hard to get to the end of their degree, or the corporate professional who is trying to put in the hard hours to get that promotion. These lives are very full already. Is there room in any life for inspiration and, if so, where do we find it?

Gary Metivier:

We have to find it every day and it has to be in all walks of life. And all of us have to find it. We have to force ourselves to find it because if you just seek for tomorrow, right? You've heard the country song, if you will, about you have to live for today; live as if today was your last day of your life. What's going to put a smile on your face today? Are you going to stop - actually, and it sounds cliche - but are you going to stop and smell the roses? Are you going to take a walk in the woods and make yourself stop and listen to the birds chirp? Hear the sound of bark falling off a tree, or a branch breaking, or a rabbit running through? And stop and turn everything off and just say, let's reconnect in some way every single day and live for today? Because there are no guarantees of a tomorrow and, even more than that, there's no guarantee of a happy tomorrow. So we have to make the most of every day and make ourselves feel like, 'Okay, I smiled today' or 'I took a moment and made somebody else smile', which to me is even more important. 'I stopped and talked to that clerk who I know is supporting a couple of kids and is having a tough day; and I stopped and said, "How's your day going?" And I got a look, and I'm like, "Well, you know what? There'll be better tomorrow and the sun's going to come out" and make them smile. Say a joke or something and you'll walk away from that - you gave them a smile and you gained something in your heart from that as well. We can all do that every single day and enjoy the joy. The joy. There's so much joy in life that we fast forward through. You know, even like you said, for the medical student that is just pounding the books and worried about midterms. Stop and think, 'You know what? How cool is it that I love learning about DNA and RNA sequencing? Uh, some people may think I'm a nerd, but I love this stuff. It brings me joy.' We have to find the things that bring us joy, whether it's baking cookies or finding a cure to cancer. We owe that to ourselves and that's the only way that we can actually peace of mind.

Kim Forrester:

I can see that what you've done there is cycled back to your earlier answer about, or your early explanation about, consumption. Perhaps the first step for all of us is to become more aware of how much of our day is spent in consuming and actually turn some of that time into creating. Right? Stop consuming so much and start creating in that space that we find.

Gary Metivier:

Do something. Right? We have to do something. And if you don't mind me sharing this side story and you talked earlier about winning awards. And I do have on my website and places where, you know, I've won some Emmys and nominations for several things. And I have to tell you about the first time my wife talked me into going, after I won my first Emmy. She talked me into going to the presentation for the second Emmy. And I said, 'Well, I don't want to put a tux on and stand in front of some room of a bunch of people that all they're thinking about is 'This is all about getting a trophy and saying, "Hey, look at me, look at me."' And she, along with my boys, said, 'Dad, you need to go this time. You should go. You've never gone to pick up any of your awards. But you need to go.' So I thought of something. I'm like, 'Okay, how can I make this different? If I win this, what do I say? What do I do?' And when I got up there on that stage and I held up my Emmy, and I got to thank my mom - my mom raised 12 children, worked so hard all her life. And that was my moment to take to the stage and say, 'Mom, this is for you. I love you.' And what that meant to me was everything. That was the highlight of my career. Not getting the statue, but being able to say that to my mom. And so I don't care about the awards, which we as a society seem to care so much about. But it did also give me the freedom from my bosses, if you will, to be able to keep telling stories that matter. But the best of all, I got to say, 'Mom, this is for you' and that was pretty cool.

Kim Forrester:

That's really beautiful, Gary. I want to come back to that 'do something'. You know, you've mentioned a couple of times, 'Do something with your day. Do something with your life.' Pablo Picasso actually said that inspiration exists but it has to find us working. And that sort of begs the question, how do we best engage with inspiration so that it's not wasted, for wont of a better word. When we feel inspired by someone - or something, or the rabbit that's hopping across the field, or the birds, or the bark falling off the tree, as you mentioned - what do we do with that rush of energy?

Gary Metivier:

You take it and you identify with it in any way that you identify even with a character in a story or maybe a novel we read and we say, 'I can do that. I can try that.' You watch the story I have on my YouTube channel of an 80 year old, as I mentioned, that loves teaching so much, she refuses to retire. And she's 80. I think she played soccer in a league that she built until she was 75 years old and now she teaches young people soccer because she can't run up and down. You watch someone like that and you say, 'Cool. Tomorrow I'm going out and I'm going to offer my services to teach kids how to play soccer. Even if I don't know how to play soccer, I can be there for them. I'm going to impact some lives. I'm going to reach out to that little child that's not very athletic, sitting on the sidelines, that's being forced to play, potentially, and say, "Hey, let's have some fun with this."' It's taking simple things that you see people doing and acting on it, and then finding what you can do. You don't have to have a tremendous amount of talent to back someone's life. You just have to be willing to get off the couch, get out of your house and go do it.

Kim Forrester:

So let's talk about getting off the couch because I'm sure that there are people who are inspired, who do have a sense of yearning or passion or creativity sort of bubbling inside of them. But I know that some people are held back by things such as fear. You know, it might be fear of success or fear of failure. It could be low self worth, it could be a lack of belief in their actual dream and vision. What advice would you give to my listeners regarding acting on inspiration? How do we overcome those hurdles?

Gary Metivier:

Well, first off, why are we afraid to fail? That's the first question I think people need to answer. Are you worried about public ridicule? I mean, that goes back to how many likes am I going to get on my Instagram picture? 'Oh, somebody else got 200 and I only got five. Nobody likes me. Nobody cares about me.' We have to love ourselves, as you know, before we can love other people. Right Kim? So we have to find ways to tell ourselves that, 'Hey, it's okay to go out there and fail.' Failing is better than than doing nothing at all. I don't have to be the best. In fact, I do things that I'm not very good at and I'll sometimes just say, 'Hey, I'm not really good at this, but I'm going to give it a try because who are you doing it for?' That's the big question. Are you doing it for other people; you're doing it for people to see you be able to slam dunk a basketball, or are you doing it because you like to participate and be around people? You enjoy your sport even if you're not good at it? Who cares? As you know, a fear of failure stops us from doing most things in our lives. Fear of failure overcomes that good feeling when we do something that we like. So you've got to overcome that fear of failure first and say, 'At the end of the day, does it really matter? Who cares? I'm not out to impress other people. This is for me.' And even helping other people, it's for you. It has to make you feel good inside for you to be able to do it on a true level where you're not out there searching for accolades. You're doing it because it's the right thing to do. It makes you feel good.

Kim Forrester:

I love that. A couple of years ago, you left your career in broadcasting and you are now doing something for you. You are chasing the stories that really truly matter to you. Has your outlook on life changed since you've been able to pursue the heart of the story, Gary? Has it changed your level of inspiration or your approach to life?

Gary Metivier:

It has changed my life completely, Kim. I walked away; it shocked everybody. I had another 15, 20 years I could have done this; big market job offers coming in, had a lot of stuff. And I said, 'Wait a minute, I'm going to stop and ask myself that one big question. "Why am I doing this and is it going to matter tomorrow? Is it making me happy? Is it helping my family?"' In fact, my wife was concerned that I was under so much stress, fighting this constant battle of corporate news, now, that has changed dramatically over the past few years that she said, 'You know, you're probably going to get cancer from this. You don't seem happy anymore. Your joy is not quite there except when you work on your special projects, which are getting fewer and fewer.' So I said, 'You know what? You're right. I want to be inspired. I want to be happy again.' So I turned around and walked away from a job. I wasn't really ready to retire - and definitely not financially ready to retire, but I'm like, 'It doesn't matter anymore. We're going to take this chance. How about we take this chance together and go search for happiness, tell only positive, inspiring stories every day and do that?' And my wife, who is a nurse, was very supportive. She said, 'You know what? You've worked hard all these years. Let's do it.' And boy within ... now, of course, the first few weeks I was freaking out because it had been, it was like I was on a train, right? Going a hundred miles an hour for 20 plus years and now all of a sudden it stopped. And I was like, 'Wow, I don't have these automatic deadlines and whatnot. I also didn't have a paycheck coming in. But I found the sense of joy just overcome me. And that sense, as you mentioned, Kim, of inspiration. I started writing more. I'm doing more of these podcasts. I'm writing books again. And in fact, I have about 20 different writing projects going on for books, nonfiction and for children's books and all sorts of things I've rediscovered about myself. The true passions. And then you stop and say, Kim, you say, 'Man, what have I been doing all these years? Doing that for a paycheck?' Again, tomorrow I could drop dead of a heart attack. So where, where's the happiness? Where's the joy there, of fighting every day in a system that you no longer find joy in? So all of us, I think, have to find a time in our life where we say, 'Is this right for me?' And walking away is not failure. Walking away is, in fact, winning because now you're saying, 'Okay, now my next chapter of life is going to be this - win, lose or draw. Let's check it out.' And so far so good for us.

Kim Forrester:

I wish we could bottle that emotion; that feeling that you were just describing there; that sensation of joy. It is a feeling that I feel whenever I'm engaging in one of these interviews. I am truly inspired by the people that I speak to on this podcast. I am inspired by the whole concept of taking goodness and amplifying it out into the world. And in the morning, when I know I'm about to engage in an interview like this, I feel enlivened and I feel so aligned with a source of energy and creativity and passion. Describe your morning, Gary, when you are about to go and engage in a story that you know is going to be inspiring and uplifting.

Gary Metivier:

Well, I must tell you, mine starts at night, too, because I do a lot of writing at night. In fact, my, my wife, will try to make me stop working because I like to keep writing. I just I have so much joy in writing - in particular video stories, or podcasts, or whatever they may be, because I get into the head of it. I go there, go to that special place in my little brain and I just create this thing. And I can actually see it in there as I'm writing this. And then, in the morning, I get excited because I'm like, 'Okay, cool. I'm going to pick up on this, finish this project and move into this.' Now, of course, not every day is wonderful because I have a production company and I do have some demands on me from more and more clients that are now calling that they'll want us to help share their stories, which is nice. I'm keeping that a very small part of what I do. But you do have to still keep the lights on, if you will. But I find joy every day by saying, 'I'm going to share this story and see how people react to it' and just keep going. And boy, I got to tell you, it feels so much better than I used to feel. I used to wake up and just dream every day of 'When's Friday coming? When's the weekend going to be here?' I was pushing my life away, just fighting for the weekend. That was also fleeting and that would just be there for, you know, a little while. Now it was gone. And then you're back to the drudge of Monday. 'Here it comes.' We all need to stop and realize there are people that are inspired out there, and we can be one of them.

Kim Forrester:

What I have discovered is that this serves me. I guess, when I'm inspired, it's serves me as much as what I hope it serves the people who listen to it. Gary, I love the way you explained it - that whole sort of sense of waking up on Monday and wishing that it was Friday, because I'm sure that a lot of people can identify with that. And I'd love for people to understand from this discussion that there can be another way, right? There can be a way where you wake up on a Monday and you've got something special planned, even if it's something that's a small part of your day. But having that inspiration can change your entire outlook on life. Gary, final question. It's one I ask every guest on the Eudaemonia podcast. Can you offer a simple morning reminder to my listeners? I normally ask for a practice or a mantra, an affirmation, something that can help my listeners become more inspired in their daily lives.

Gary Metivier:

I wake up and I think, how am I going to smile today and how am I going to change and share this smile with someone else? I'm going to find a way to do that. Whether it's going to the store and stopping and talking to a clerk, or talking to a stranger, or stopping to talk with a neighbor that may be sad or lonely or depressed. I look for the joy in life and realize that, if I can share my smile, then they light up. Then they share theirs with somebody else. Find a way, every single day, to inspire yourself so that you can inspire others. Find something that touches your heart. And that means going out and doing things. So it can be something very, very simple, but finding a way to make a connection with people in our lives make us all so much better, if we all just be a part of this together.

Kim Forrester:

Thank you, Gary. If my listeners want to find out more about you and The Heart of the Story, where can they go?

Gary Metivier:

Well, luckily it's pretty simple with The Heart of the Story - it's the name of my podcast and my YouTube channel. It's actually The Heart of the Story with Gary Metivier. Now that last name is kind of hard to spell, but if you look up 'The Heart of the Story with Gary' the rest of it will pop up. And we're so excited. You know, we started this almost a year ago. We started the YouTube channel with my first story, by the way, it was about my mom. I was thinking, you know, I've interviewed world leaders, I've interviewed celebrities, I've interviewed all people from walks of life, but my mom raised 12 kids and I never got to interview her. So I took my camera equipment - and I almost lost my mom just a few months before that. So I realized this is the time to try to capture her story. So I asked her. I said, 'Hey mom, could I interview you?' And she says, 'Oh, I don't want to be on camera. I don't want that.' And I'm like, 'Well, what if we put the camera on and you and I just had a talk like we always do?' My mom and I were always very close. We'd stay up till wee hours of the morning just talking to each other. And she said, 'Sure'. So I put it together and gave it to her for Mother's Day last year. And she said that was one of the best gifts she's ever received and then gave me permission to post it. So that was our first story, one year ago. So if you get a chance again, check that out. And that, to me it's what it's really all about. So that was our first story, one year ago, and we just launched the podcast this Thanksgiving. So that's very fresh too. And we're just kinda continuing to grow, continuing to share stories. And a lot of people still write to me and tell me about people and events and things, and I discover new stories every day. And that gives me inspiration every day to go out and find out even more.

Kim Forrester:

Well, your inspiration is palpable, Gary, and I am inspired by having spent this last half hour with you. Thank you from my heart for honoring me with your presence and your wisdom and your insights today.

Gary Metivier:

Thank you, Kim.

Kim Forrester:

The American singer, Ella Fitzgerald, once said, 'Just don't give up trying to do what you really want to do. Where there is love and inspiration, I don't think you can go wrong.' You've been listening to the Eudaemonia podcast. If you'd like to learn more about how to live a truly flourishing life, please subscribe and check out www.eudaemoniapod.com for more inspiring episodes. I'm Kim Forrester. Until next time, be well be kind to yourself and ignite your inspiration.